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Fattoira le Sorgenti Respiro Chianti, 2005, Tuscany, Italy  Add/Read Comments



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Sorgenti Respiro Chianti

I fondly recall, during my first exploratory steps into wine, becoming very excited in sorting out the various sub-zones of Chianti and believing I could detect the subtle nuances in flavour of a Chianti Colli Senesi over a Chianti Classico or Chianti Rufina. Even pin-pointing the names on a map added a fizzle of excitement when drinking said bottles. Whichever guide book I referenced at the time listed those mysterious terrior-based differences with reverence.

Today I wouldn't have a clue on how to spot a Senesi over a Arentini and, all thse years ago, I'm sure it was all suggestion and imagination rather than a fully-developed palate.

There are seven sub-zones covering Chianti. The heart of the region is Chianti Classico, Chianti Rufina lies to the north-east while Chianti Montalbano and four hillside areas are named after near-by cities Colli Fiorentini (Florence), Colli Senesi (Siena), Colli Pisane (Pisa) and Colli Arentini (Arezzo).

This example hails from Colli Fiorentini, a classic blend of Sangiovese with just a splash of the white Trebbiano (2%). The local rules have removed the 'traditional' requirement for a white grape component and allow up to 15% of foreign varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon.



Red Wine Review/Tasting NoteWine Tasting Note: Le Sorgenti Respiro Chianti , 2005, Chianti Colli Fiorentini, Tuscany, Italy
Stockist: Cadman Fine Wines [More on UKWOL] Price: £9.99 [More on Adegga / Snooth]
Upfront tiz mellow and fruity, wood envelopes the rounded pleasantness, then a savoury edge develops with tannins raising and acidity cleansing. A long mellow finish, with an edge of chocolate covered cherries, porcini and something 'autumnal'. Alcohol 13.5%.

Chianti should really be enjoyed with food - the medium-bodied quite acidic wines were created for food. Tomato based dishes are often quoted as ideal matches; my choice would be a rich, slow cooked, Bolognese based pasta dish, as pictured.

Scribblings Rating - 90/100 [3.75 out of 5]





The name 'Respiro' simply means breath. "To stop making Chianti for us would be like stopping breathing" is the phrase used by the passionate and dedicated Ferrari family. Rarely do you meet a family as focused and as in touch with the land and its produce.

Grown high up in a natural amphitheatre, the grapes from the 'La Sala' vineyard and feature primarily Sangiovese but with a small percentage of the white grape Trebbiano added ot give the wine freshness and vitality"

Food for Chianti - Pasta Bolognese

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