Spittoon.biz Bookmark This page
Muscat de Beaumes de VeniseWhy are dessert wines so expensive? Is it the producers simply trying to create a cache, a luxury item just like those rosé champagne producers? The production techniques are pretty standard and really, just like pink champagne, shouldn’t command a premium.

Perhaps because they are so expensive, people simply do not purchase them in quantities required to grasp a profit. But wouldn’t reducing the price entice people to buy more?
As an example, this half bottle of sweet Muscat costs £6.99. A full bottle therefore would retail at around £12. Why so expensive?

Many would baulk at paying this for a Sunday splash out wine let alone a simple, dessert wine. One that also happened to be the cheapest off the dessert wine shelf at my local supermarket. With long lived, small production, wines such as Sauternes the high prices are comprehendable; but for a relatively simple, are I say bog-standard, wine…?
Don’t misunderstand; it’s a nice enough wine. I just ponder the elevated price.



Dessert/Sweet Wine Review/Tasting NoteWine Tasting Note: Muscat de Beaumes de Venise, NV, Rhone, France
Stockist: Waitrose Price: £6.99 half bottle. [More on Adegga]
Simple, lightly honeyed with a slightly elderflower, grapey aroma. Sweet palate with a correspondingly cleansing level of acidity that keeps it fresh and clean. Floral, lemons, lychee’s. Reasonable length. Alcohol 15%.

Scribblings Rating – 84/100 [3 out of 5]

Half this bottle was used in the making of Baked Figs with Muscat; a rather nice dessert that was a little too sweet to match harmoniously with the wine. The baking reducing concentrating the sugars I guess.

4 Comments »

  1. duck says:

    I think you are being a little unfair – a decent dessert wine will be late harvested by hand from a small residual crop. If it is made from botrytis-affected grapes, then it is quite a risky business because the conditions for creating noble rot are finely balanced and noble rot can easily turn into something less attractive. The grapes themselves will be shrivelled and very concentrated so more will be needed to make a bottle.
    Many dessert wines are also barrel-fermented, incurring more expense and time. There is also a premium on half-bottles, because in the UK we drink less of them at the end of a meal whereas the French will also drink dessert wines as an aperitif!!

  2. Douglas says:

    …Muscat been love

  3. Andrew says:

    DOUGLAS!
    Bet you have been waiting months to use that one… :-)

  4. [...] simple really – take some whole dried figs, a half bottle of sweet Muscat, three swathes of orange peel and a large tablespoon of flavoursome thick honey, mix all and bake [...]

Leave a Comment »




Advert

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Recent Posts

31
Aug

Moustachioed Wine Man

Somewhere during the visit to Pichon Longueville I spotted this sad looking chap. The drooped shoulders just add to his unhappy demeanour or maybe its theRead More

27
Aug

A Wine For Your Burger

Today is National Burger Day. I am sure Burger King and the ol’ golden triangle guys are loving it. But something a little more classy andRead More

26
Aug

Video: Tanqueray No. Ten Silver Martini Cocktail

This month Tanqueray No. TEN celebrated at WORLD CLASS, the annual search for the globe’s best bartenders, hosted in the heart of London at 33 FitzroyRead More

24
Aug

Qcumber and Gin

Cucumber – an occasional garnish for a gin and tonic and one that works best with herbaceous-led gins. Looking at the likes of Caorunn and GinRead More

10
Aug

Winery Outbuilding Chateau Mauvesin-Barton

A photo taken in Bordeaux for this weeks Sunday Wine Shot – rather apt as the group who went on the trip are meeting for aRead More

7
Aug

Cocktails at Scarfes

I have to say I do love this bar. The plush, slightly eclectic décor had me as I walked through the door, while the cocktails wereRead More

Top

© 2004-2014 Spittoon.biz All Rights Reserved